Learn to Paint with Encaustic: An Encaustic Class by Appointment

Learn to Paint with Encaustic: An Encaustic Class by Appointment

If you’re interested in learning to paint with encaustic, I am offering encaustic classes by appointment. I don’t profess to know everything about the medium, but what I do know, I’m happy to share with you.


If you’re new to encaustic, I can teach you the essential information you need to get started and offer you hands-on experience with various techniques to create smooth and textured finishes. This is a great way to try out the medium before investing in tools and materials. Here’s what we can cover in a full-day session:

1. Brief history of encaustic
2. Essential materials including brush and paint options, fusing instruments, and appropriate supports and grounds
3. Studio setup including ventilation, proper use of equipment, and safety practices
4. Fundamentals of encaustic painting including sizing a panel, fusing techniques, and applying encaustic paint
5. Encaustic painting techniques including dripping, splattering, layering and scraping, accretion, and intarsia.

For those who already have experience with encaustic, here are some “beyond the basic” topics we can cover:

1. Using oil and other media with encaustic
2. Collage and assemblage techniques with encaustic
3. Photo transfer technique
4. Photography and encaustic
5. Other mixed media techniques

Classes are held in my private studio in South Orange County, California. Class rates and hours are as follows:

Private Sessions (1 Student):
Half day (9am – 12pm): $140
Full day (9am – 3pm with a lunch break from 12-1): $200

Private Sessions with a Friend (Maximum 2 Students):
Half day (9am – 12pm): $120 per person
Full day (9am – 3pm with a lunch break from 12-1): $180 per person

I will provide the necessary encaustic materials, including a 6×6 wood panel so you can take home a finished project. If we’re covering mixed media techniques, you may need to bring additional materials.

If you’re interested, please send me an email so we can work out a schedule and discuss what topics you want to cover. Payment via cash, check, or credit card is made on the day of the session.



I’d love to hear your thoughts. Email me your comments here.

Displaying Your Encaustic Minis

Displaying Your Encaustic Minis

The 4×4 Encaustic Minis each comes mounted on a signed 6×6 acid-free matboard. They are not yet ready to hang when you purchase them. To help you display the paintings properly, below are some guidelines for framing your artwork. (Sizes are in inches.)

  • Whether you choose a store-bought frame or a custom-made one, use any size frame matted for a 5×5 photo. (See samples below.) Don’t use a store-bought frame matted for a 4×4 photo because the actual opening would only be 3½ x 3½ — too small to show the whole artwork.
  • The frame should have a very thick mat or a double mat with a spacer in between (usually called airfloat frame). Mat thickness or spacing between mats should be at least 3/16″.

Below are some examples of frame options. I bought both frames shown from Michael’s for under $20 each. (With a 50% coupon, you can even get them cheaper.) They have an easel back so you can either hang them on a wall or display them on a table or shelf.

The painting below is enclosed in a classic black frame with an 8×8 extra thick mat cut to a 5×5 opening. Frame width is 5/8″ and overall dimensions are 9×9.


In this second example, the painting is displayed in a white airfloat frame. It has an 8×8 double mat with spacers in between and cut to a 5×5 opening. Frame width is 1¼” and overall dimensions are 10×10.


If you’re more interested in custom-made frames for better quality, similar sizes will cost around $60. Note that encaustic paintings are generally not enclosed in glass because it’s susceptible to greenhouse effect which may soften the wax when exposed to prolonged extreme heat. But since we’re dealing with small works on paper here, framing the paintings behind glass should be fine. Just remember not to display them in an area that receives direct sunlight (which is true for all types of painting).

Speaking of the wax softening or even melting, this is the most common fear about encaustic’s perceived fragility. I assure you, unless under very extreme conditions, you have nothing to worry about. A typical indoor environment, even on a sweltering summer day, is not hot enough to melt encaustic art. It takes 160°F (71°C) for encaustic medium to melt. Under that condition, you would already be suffering from severe hyperthermia to even worry about the artwork.


Now back to displaying your artwork, here are some examples of multiple paintings displayed on a wall, for inspiration:




I’d love to hear your thoughts. Email me your comments here.

The Aesthetics of Melancholy

The Aesthetics of Melancholy

I am thrilled to write my first feature article for Somerset Studio Gallery, a special bi-annual mixed media magazine from Stampington & Co. The 4-page article, entitled “The Aesthetics of Melancholy,” is included in the Winter 2016 Issue. In it I share how I harness my melancholic tendencies, prevalent during the winter months, and turn them into inspiration for my creative works. I also discuss some techniques that I incorporate in my encaustic projects.




Here’s an excerpt from the article:

“Winter always puts me in a state of melancholy. Maybe it was the bleak, icy winters from when I used to live in the Midwest or the long dark evenings that even California, where I now reside, is not exempt from. Whatever it is, I cannot escape the sense of longing and sadness that pervades me. If I let it overwhelm me, melancholy easily turns into depression – that emotional state of resignation that looms over me like a dark cloud. To combat this, I learned to channel the various shades of emotions and memories that melancholy can evoke into my creative work. This way I can embrace melancholy when it comes and treat it as a source of inspiration and a time for indulgent self-reflection.”



I’d love to hear your thoughts. Email me your comments here.

Exhibition in Paris, France

Exhibition in Paris, France

Salon Art Shopping, the biggest and most important annual art event in France, is coming up in a few weeks! And I will be joining them this year! Yey! It is my first international show and I am super excited! You can find my encaustic work in B23-24. I have tickets to the event for those who would like to attend! (Posted May 18, 2015)




I’d love to hear your thoughts. Email me your comments here.